Standards organizations provide a starting point for understanding human-centric lighting and healthy buildings, but a clear measurement is still needed to impact the industry

A new report from analyzes the role human-centric lighting plays in healthy buildings, discussing challenges around standardization and providing recommendations for stakeholders.

Growing interest in healthy buildings—which focus on occupant well-being, health, and productivity—is paving the way for new opportunities in the commercial lighting industry. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lighting controls are some of the technologies helping to provide actionable data that can influence the relationship between occupants and buildings, in addition to providing cost savings. : However, according to a new report from , technology to measure and help quantify human-centric lighting is underutilized, and no clear standard measurement for human-centric lighting has been agreed upon.

“Human-centric lighting has been a growing buzzword within the lighting industry and is gaining attention by manufacturers, building owners, operators and occupants, and researchers,” says Krystal Maxwell, research analyst with Navigant Research. “But while interest and available products are increasing, there is still a lack of research available on human-centric lighting, how to quantify the benefits of it, and the best way to measure it.”

While standards organizations provide a starting point for understanding human-centric lighting and healthy buildings, lack of agreement on measurement is expected to delay industry progress, according to the report. In the meantime, government organizations can work to make the components of green and healthy buildings the norm, which is expected to be crucial for the long-term success of these types of certifications.

The report, , examines the growing interest in occupant health and well-being, focusing on human-centric lighting and the role it plays in the healthy building. The study discusses the building types that are a key focus for human-centric lighting and lack of agreement on standardization for quantifying how this type of lighting can influence productivity. Recommendations are provided on how stakeholders can help ensure human-centric lighting plays a positive role in healthy buildings. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Stefanie Bradtner

+49.221.270.70.142

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Quantifying and Standardizing the Measurement of Human-Centric Lighting, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Technology to Measure and Quantify Human-Centric...

Market players demonstrating safe, effective applications will be key to the evolution of unmanned vehicle regulation and market growth

A new report from examines unmanned vehicle (UV) technology in the areas of agriculture, logistics, asset inspection, emergency management, and insurance, providing insight on the current and future regulatory environment.

More industries are looking to UVs to collect visual information and carry out complex tasks as a safer, cheaper, and more reliable alternative to incumbent solutions. Although the majority of today’s UV use cases are for asset inspection, aerial imaging, and agricultural operations, improving technologies will be revolutionary for newer applications that take advantage of beyond visual line of sight and autonomous operations. : According to a new report from , current regulatory structures limit the ability to test and deploy innovative UV services, but as UV pilot programs establish the safety and reliability of the technology, regulations will likely adapt.

“Regulation has an important role in ensuring safety and protection of the public good as these new technology solutions are trialed and rolled out commercially,” says William Drier, research associate with Navigant Research. “However, varying regulatory structures can also limit what kinds of applications can be deployed, particularly for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).”

To succeed in this market, Navigant Research recommends companies identify a true value proposition over current solutions. Developers should prioritize specialized solutions for automating tasks, and be conscious that demonstrating safety and reliability will be key to the evolution of regulation and market growth, according to the report.

The report, , analyzes the increasing prevalence and advancement of UV technology in agriculture, logistics, asset inspection, emergency management, and insurance, as well as how upcoming changes will affect the growth of the market. The study provides commentary on the current regulatory environment and how Navigant Research envisions the future of these regulations and their impact on the UV market. It also identifies opportunities for stakeholders to focus on and what lies ahead to both be better adapted in the current market environment and facilitate the adoption of commercial UV operations. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Stefanie Bradtner

+49.221.270.70.142

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Capturing New Commercial Opportunities with Unmanned Vehicles, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Pilot Projects Are Helping to Establish Safety...

Turbine manufacturers should continue to sell and invest in data analytics, while big wind plant owners can acquire in-house assets to maximize savings                                           

A new report from examines data collection within the wind power industry as asset owners seek to improve wind plant performance and manage operations and maintenance (O&M) costs.

Today’s wind plant owners face increasing pressure to optimize the performance of their wind projects, foresee impending component failures, and grow O&M savings. An increasingly sophisticated data technology ecosystem of sensors, condition monitoring systems (CMSs), turbine optimization platforms, and predictive analytics (PA) software can provide cost savings and risk management for plants large and small. : According to a new report from , there is considerable room for further deployment of data collection and analysis systems across the market.

“There is a growing addressable market for data collection and analysis platforms in the existing US and broader global wind fleet because not all wind plant owners have maximized the use of such systems,” says Jesse Broehl, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. “Where there is room for more adoption is with advanced pattern recognition (APR) or other statistical modeling methods or platforms to address turbine and site performance optimization.”

For industry players looking to fill gaps in the market or streamline costs, Navigant Research recommends wind turbine manufacturers continue to sell and invest in data analytics. Third-party data analytics vendors should stress their independence and target opportunities at the turbine pre-end-of-warranty stage. Wind plant owners not already doing so should test and evaluate the data analytics offerings and big wind plant owners should consider acquiring in-house assets to maximize savings.

The report, , focuses on data collection within the wind power industry as asset owners seek to improve wind plant performance and manage and minimize O&M costs. The study analyzes the data collection strategies of anonymized wind plant owners surveyed as part of Navigant’s Generation Knowledge Service (GKS) Wind Benchmarking service. The GKS peer group includes 9.3 GW from a variety of turbine models, plant sizes, ages, and O&M contract types. The results show what type of data is collected, how it is usually collected, and where there is room for data analytics growth. It also examines how and when CMS and PA platforms are being deployed in the marketplace for new and operational turbines. Recommendations are provided on how wind turbine OEMs, wind plant owners and other stakeholders should explore the growing addressable market for data collection and analysis platforms. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Stefanie Bradtner

+49.221.270.70.142

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Capturing and Maximizing Wind Power Plant Data, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: A Growing Market for Data Collection and...

While today’s plug-in electric vehicle market is concentrated in home charging, energy demand is expected to shift more toward fleet, private, and public charging in the next decade

A new report from examines the global market for plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging equipment, providing forecasts for equipment sales, segmented by region, technology, access type, and location type, through 2027.

By the end of 2018, over 5 million PEVs are expected to be on roads globally, and by 2027, that number is expected to increase more than 10 times. A PEV population of this size will require nearly as many charging ports, and these ports will need to be more capable and sophisticated, offering higher power capacities and smarter technology to relay vehicle and charger information. : According to a new report from , annual revenue for sales and installation of electric vehicle supply equipment is expected to grow from $6.5 billion in 2018 to over $36 billion in 2027.

“The focus in the market is on increasing charging speed, with the rollout of ultra-fast chargers just getting underway, however, equally important developments are emerging in vehicle-grid integration and load management technologies,” says Scott Shepard, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. “These technologies seek to further improve the business case for plug-in vehicles through energy cost reduction and increase the number of chargers commercial property owners can add to parking infrastructure without additional investments to expand building electrical infrastructure.”

According to the report, the current PEV market is heavily skewed toward home charging, however, over the next 10 years, PEV energy demand will likely shift more toward fleet, private, and public chargers. The market is also expected to see major investments from automakers, utilities, energy companies, and governments during the next few years, but for the long term, viable business cases will need to be developed for each charging segment.

The report, , analyzes the global market for PEV charging equipment sales across four major use cases: home charging, private charging, fleet charging, and public charging. The study covers the major drivers for the charging market and analyzes the potential uptake of alternating current (AC), direct current (DC), and wireless EV supply equipment. Global market forecasts for charging equipment sales, segmented by region, technology, access type, and location type, extend through 2027. The report also assesses the key emerging market and technology trends and the competitive landscape. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the .

Contact: Stefanie Bradtner

+49.221.270.70.142

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, EV Charging Equipment Market Overview, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

Read more: Revenue for Sales and Installation of Electric...

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